Tag Archives: New Mexico

One of our many foibles

Is multi-tasking all it’s cracked up to be?

We hope not, since we’re clearly gifted with the art of only focusing on one project at a time.

In this video, I attempt to demonstrate exactly what we’ve been focusing on (instead of posting to the blog…and yes, I feel very guilty, but that doesn’t seem to make the posts magically appear…foible of Me.)

Enjoy!

Transitioning into Journey

From March 2014

Journey, by its most basic definition, is getting from point A to point B…traveling from one place to another.

A and B may be physical, mental or emotional places, even financial places, but the key concept typically defining journey remains the same: getting to some place.

Casey and I have a slightly different understanding of the definition of journey. It’s not a destination-based wistfulness, “man, I can’t wait to get to such-and-such-a-place!” For us it’s more of an attitude or mindset than an actual departure/travel/destination paradigm.

Journey becomes a lifestyle.

I’ve heard this great piece of advice given to new cruising sailors, specifically those who built their own vessel;

after you sail away from the hubbub and fanfare of that first launch, take your boat to the first safe, comfortable anchorage, throw out the pick, then just sit, and simply breathe, absorb the fact you are now on journey.

You see the journey itself is the destination; being in that mindful place that defines your life, not governed by others, not bound by a knowledge that at some point you must return to that which you just left, your world is now your own, and horizon begets horizon.

Without an anchor line behind you or an imposing expectation before you, the only thing of importance becomes ‘the right now.’ How you enjoy that ongoing moment is up to you!

There’s bound to be some zen-like grooviness attached to this that I will probably never understand, however I do know it feels good, both at the time and lingering on for a while until other experiences take its place. The joy of being ‘on journey’ is something that can be described, but never known until it takes place for the individual.

The moment the car starts and we’re looking to the horizon, we are on Journey. How long will it take us to get to the Sea of Cortez? May be days, or the way we travel, weeks south but we are in that special place, living each day as it comes.

Shaun

Noah with No Flood

What is that crazy couple doing building a boat in the desert??

From previous post:

The high desert of the Southwestern United States is not a particularly popular place for boat building.  With a variety of cactus, the occasional tumbleweed, and roads like the Santa Fe Trail, a few visitors even told us that it was easier for them to imagine Billy the Kid on the main plaza than our little boat taking shape.

As it turns out there’s not a lot of demand in New Mexico for the specific marine-grade materials we required either. It took a lot of work to find them, and in the end we had most of them shipped in from around the country.  Marine plywood from California.  Epoxy from Florida.

Picking up the Marine Ply from Albuquerque. Shipped in from California. September 2013. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer
Picking up the Marine Ply from Albuquerque. Shipped in from California. September 2013. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer

Wilber was created by a process known as ‘stitch and glue.’ In short, panels of plywood are cut out to particular shapes, the panels are bent and twisted so edges line up and they get ‘stitched’ together with copper wire or zip ties.

Plywood cut-outs for one hull. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. NM USA 2013
Plywood cut-outs for one hull. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. NM USA 2013
Wilber's Hull taking shape. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. NM USA 2013
Wilber’s Hull taking shape. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. NM USA 2013
Zip ties for stitching the parts together. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013
Zip ties for stitching the parts together. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013

Alignment gets checked to ensure the boat is straight and true, then the joints get ‘glued’ with epoxy, filler and fiberglass.  The result is an exceptionally strong, yet light weight body.

Epoxy to glue it together. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013
Epoxy to glue it together. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013
Preparing Fibreglass. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013
Preparing Fibreglass. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013
Laying Fibreglass. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013
Laying Fibreglass. Wharram Tahiti Wayfarer. 2013

 

vino.
vino.
painting at last!
painting at last!

 

Ooh...Shiny!!
Ooh…Shiny!!

Just when you think you’re almost finished, many extremely tedious hours are then spent surface finishing and painting. In the end a beautiful, stylish boat is has been created.  It sits patiently, calling you to take it to the water and promising to carry you to any horizon you desire.

and yet still more to do...
and yet still more to do…adding filler
Huckleberry the Moose watches over Wilber in the Living Room
Huckleberry the Moose watches over Wilber in the Living Room

 

Nearly ready.
Nearly ready.

*You’ll note in these photos that Wilber was not created in a standard workshop nor backyard.  We began him outdoors, but the epoxy requires 15.5C (60F) to set.  As the autumn temperature dropped we were forced to move him indoors.  When I say indoors, I should probably clarify at this point, that indoors means the spare bedroom at my Mum and Dad-in-law’s house…except for the week we had to keep it in the living room!  (Thank you mummy and daddy.)

**You’ll also note that Wilber, being 21’ long, sticks out of the bedroom door into the hallway.  Originally he was meant to be a double-canoe catamaran, but since we could only build one hull (canoe) at a time, logistics dictated he either became an outrigger canoe, or we had to spend nearly double the time building him.  In the interest of getting the Sea of Cortez as quickly as possible, we opted for the outrigger canoe!